Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘starting a group’

Having created and hosted my first event, I wanted to give your the early results. It was a small event with 12 attendees. I had planned for 15-20 and there were four last minute cancellations. I was very stressed that the event would be too small, thinking that people would feel it was a waste of their time. I have attended networking events and been disappointed with turnout, I didn’t want people to feel that way at my event.

It didn’t, and here’s why:

  1. Networking wasn’t the focus. The event had a purpose and an activity, other than passing out cards.
  2. I didn’t call it networking. I used the word “social” and it felt like a party.
  3. I had a great room. The studio at Peterson Photography was set up with a couch, coffee table and some small bistro chairs. We spread the food and wine out in three stations so people would gather in small groups and move to get more wine, savory or sweet snacks.
  4. Small can be an advantage. Everyone who attended commented on how happy they were that it wasn’t big “like a networking thing”.
  5. Have someone else run the activity. When I have parties at home, I never get to see the guests. Having the main attraction as the portrait photography, the photographer and her assistant managed moving people in and out and I got to mingle.
  6. Invite some ringers. While my purpose was to meet new prospects, I also invited some colleagues who have become friends. Having a few people I know mixed in made it feel that much more social.
  7. Follow up. In addition to the new connections I made who already have thought of needs, We will be mailing their pictures along with some information as a secondary, subtle reinforcement. Having met both me and the photographer, they are much more likely to read about or businesses now.
  8. Lastly, I cold emailed to a list of 1700 people for four weeks and got only about 40 unsubscribes. If I had done the same thing with a newsletter about my company it would have been mass exodus, crossing those prospects off our list forever. I opened communication by offering something of value positioned well for my prospects and they responded by letting me speak to them.

I had three purposes when creating this event: build the image of my firm, get in the room with great prospects, and warm up an audience so I could email regularly about other programs and eventually other news. It has worked very well and we are in full swing promoting next month’s meatier and more expensive program, Social Media Connections, Making Then Work at Work.

Read Full Post »

Iris Creative's Headshot Social

Iris Creative's Headshot Social

If you spend a lot of time networking, consider launching an event of your own. So much of networking feels like the same events, the same food, the same people over and over. Try something new — host your own event. The advantages of creating your own event include:

•  Being seen as a leader

•  Potential alternate revenue from event sales

•  Inviting the people you want to meet and get to know better

•  An opportunity to connect with your contacts without directly selling

Not to mention an actual event to pitch for PR. It is no longer news that you launched a new website. An interesting event can bring press coverage and attention to your firm and your expertise.

At Iris Creative, we are launching two events in the upcoming months. The first is a small event titled “The Headshot Social”. We have invited local leaders from business and nonprofit to come and get an inexpensive professional portrait in a relaxed and social atmosphere. No one likes to get their picture taken, but executives need a quality shot for use in press, writing, speaking and other marketing. An individual session can cost hundreds and you really only need one image you don’t hate. If you’re in Philadelphia August 19th, join us. http://www.iriscreative.com/headshotsocial

The next event scheduled is a four session workshop on social media called “Beyond the Profile”. For marketers and professionals who have signed up on one or more social media sites but not really figured out what to do next, how social networking adds value or how to integrate it into marketing — this series is the perfect fit. The workshop will be held on four Tuesday mornings from 8-10 in Lafayette Hill, Pa, just outside of Philadelphia. The first session is September 15. More information will come. If you would like to be added to the list, please email info@iriscreative.com

Read Full Post »

A great way to expand your network and be recognized as a leader is to bring a few people together and see what happens. Need some ideas for what to do? Try these new ideas for finding common ground:

  1. Trending Topic — By following some local people on Twitter I saw a post from Valeria Maltoni of Conversation Agent about a free gathering to talk about social media.   I have learned to just go when I think something might be interesting and am usually glad I did. With coffee donated by Saxby’s and space provided by Villanova University, we had a dynamic breakfast gathering of about 20 people, only one of whom I had ever met before.
  2. Similar Client Focus — I was recently invited to a small lunch gathering by Julie Friedman Bacchini of Neptune Moon Design. We met once at a member-based networking group and she decided to invite me and 5 other people who all work with non-profits to a lunch.  I met some interesting people, got some new ideas and found a new writer to add to my list of resources.
  3. Cross Pollinating —  Know some people from one group who would be great for another? I have some peers from an association who are thinking of starting a new, niche association. They reached out to active members and mixed in other colleagues to explore the idea.
  4. Six Degrees — Years ago I met a dynamic marketer at Aramark. who is a generous referrer. Since we met, she has introduced me to a fabulous writer, and a number of other marketers. Those referrals have connected me to a brilliant strategist, subcontractors and a host of clients. I realized that the original contacts had all moved on and had not seen each other in person in years — a perfect time to arrange a lunch or drinks to thanks them for the bounty their efforts bring.
  5. Shared Need — A colleague recently introduced me to Linda Bandura, a startup marketer/designer. Within a week of meeting, Linda invited me to a head shot party she arranged with her photographer. It was a small gathering of women professionals to chat, drink tea and get that professional portrait taken that we need but all avoid. A fun way to network — and a brilliant way for a photographer to meet new prospects and a marketer to be seen as a leader. I liked it so much, I am thinking of planning one of my own and inviting clients and prospects.
  6. Fun for a Cause — Many nonprofits host social events as fundraisers. I was invited to join a group for Martini’s and Makeovers at Saks Fifth Avenue to support Dragonfly Forest, a camp for children with serious illnesses. Going to a public event with a few others you know makes it easier to try something new.
  7. Great Resource Discussion — Rather than your standard book group, try gathering to share your best resource. You could each share a synopsis of the lessons learned from a recent blog, webinar, conference or a favorite website.

An advantage of the micro-event is that it is once and done. No weekly meeting, no heavy preparation unless the group wants that. The purpose is to bring together people with some shared interest to then branch off and form their own new relationships.

The interesting thing about these events is that none of the leaders self promoted. Just coordinating and connecting raised their profile and left the impression of leadership — without saying a word other than “welcome” and “ I thought you might like to know each other”.  Think about what kind of mini-events you can plan to get to know new resources, referrers and prospects.

Looking for other ideas for how to connect in small groups, read Networking Goes Small.

Read Full Post »